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Washington Forest Protection Association Records

Repository:
University of Washington Libraries
Special Collections Library
Seattle, WA 98195
Date Range: 1908-98
Size: 206 cubic feet

Online Finding Aid

The Washington Forest Protection Association was organized in 1908 and originally named the Washington Forest Fire Association. The membership includes businesses and individuals. The purpose of the association is to promote responsible management of private forests, primarily for timber, but also for fish, wildlife, recreation, air and water quality.

The collection includes: correspondence, reports, minutes, financial records and subject files on a wide variety of forest management subjects in Washington State.

Wyona S. Coleman Papers

Repository:
University of Pittsburgh
Archives Service Center
7500 Thomas Boulevard
Pittsburgh, PA 15208
Date Range: 1971-2005
Size: 21.25 linear feet (17 boxes)

Online Finding Aid

Document a period of escalating environmental activism. A dedicated environmentalist, Coleman has campaigned on the local, state, and federal levels of government for effective means to protect and to mitigate harm to the environment caused by the acquisition of natural resources and refuse disposal. The bulk of Coleman’s papers relate to coal mining and detail her position as a representative of the Sierra Club of Pennsylvania on various committees of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Environmental Protection, formerly known as the Department of Environmental Resources. These committees addressed such issues as the impact of coal mining (especially longwall mining), solid waste disposal, and oil and natural gas drilling on the environment. Materials include committee meeting minutes and notes, correspondence, drafts of legislation, evidence of lawsuits resulting from changes in legislation, educational publications, and newspaper clippings.

Sierra Club Pennsylvania Chapter Records

Repository:
University of Pittsburgh
Archives Service Center
7500 Thomas Boulevard
Pittsburgh, PA 15208
Date Range: 1970-1997
Size: 16.25 linear feet (13 boxes)

Online Finding Aid

These records document the activities of the Pennsylvania chapter and its efforts to lawfully protect the environment of Pennsylvania while also contributing to the national Sierra Club mission. While the Pennsylvania chapter is divided into ten groups, a majority of the records have come from the Allegheny and Southwestern groups. Memos, meeting minutes, correspondence, and other materials document the Sierra Club’s local and national efforts.

North Area Environmental Council Records

Repository:
University of Pittsburgh
Archives Service Center
7500 Thomas Boulevard
Pittsburgh, PA 15208
Date Range: 1968-2001
Size: 2.5 linear feet (2 boxes)

Online Finding Aid

Document the history of the North Area Environmental Council, an Allegheny County conservation nonprofit organization founded in 1969. The collection includes materials such as guides, plans, programs, reports, maps, newspaper, magazine, and journal articles related to energy, environmental issues such as recycling and pesticide use, clean water initiatives, flood plain conservation, land use and conservation, solid and hazardous waste, storm-water management, and transportation concerns between the years 1968-2001.

Environmentalists for Full Employment Records

Repository:
University of Pittsburgh
Archives Service Center
7500 Thomas Boulevard
Pittsburgh, PA 15208
Date Range: 1969-1984
Size: 32.5 linear feet (26 boxes)

Online Finding Aid

The collection includes research files regarding environmental and labor issues, such as occupational hazards, pollution, and clean energy. Publications regarding these topics are also present, as well as records regarding unemployment and plant closures. Information regarding protests at Three Mile Island and correspondence are also included.

Allegheny County, Pa. Health Department Lead Survey Records

Repository:
University of Pittsburgh
Archives Service Center
7500 Thomas Boulevard
Pittsburgh, PA 15208
Date Range: 1971-1975
Size: 28.75 linear feet

Online Finding Aid

The Allegheny County Health Department Lead Survey, 1971-1975, was part of a nationwide effort to identify and treat cases of lead poisoning in preschool children and to remove environmental lead hazards from their homes. The Lead Survey records consist of the Administrative series (correspondence within the department and with external agencies, grant applications, records of expenses, notes on department meetings, lead testing procedures, and equipment), the Blood Lead series (individuals’ blood lead test results and summaries of the data), and the Environmental Lead Abatement series (lead test results for individual addresses and composite data per region).

Intermountain Research Station Photographs

Repository:
University of Montana
Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library
K. Ross Toole Archives
Missoula, MT 59812
Date Range: 1865-1981
Size: 49 items

Online Finding Aid

The United States Forest Service Intermountain Research Station is now known as the Rocky Mountain Research Station and is part of a network of 14 research locations throughout the Great Basin, Southwest, Rocky Mountains and parts of the Great Plains. The Rocky Mountain Research Station is headquartered in Fort Collins, Colorado.

The photographs in this collection are of various areas throughout Montana and northern Idaho and are dated 1865-1981. Most images show landscapes but also included are towns, mining camps, Fort Missoula, Fort Logan, and activities such as mining, agriculture and freighting. These images were probably to be used as part of the Unites States Forest Service General Technical Report INT-158 titled: “Fire and Vegetative Trends in the Northern Rockies: Interpretations from 1871-1982 Photographs,” published in 1983 by George E. Gruell of the U.S. Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station in Ogden, Utah. These photographs are likely the images not used in the final report.

Forest Farmers Association Records

Repository:
University of Georgia
Hargrett Library
Richard B. Russell Building
300 South Hull Street
Athens, Georgia 30602
Date Range: 1960-81
Size: 71 cubic feet

Online Finding Aid

The collection consists of records of the Forest Farmers Association from ca. 1960-1981. The records include correspondence, minutes, legislative files, membership files, financial records, printed materials, photographs, and scrapbooks. The collection documents the activities of the Association, as well as the Southern Forestry Council, Southern Forest Resources Council, and Southern Forestry Conference.

David Hawkins (1913-2002) Papers

Repository:
University of Colorado at Boulder Libraries
Archives
1720 Pleasant Street
Boulder, CO 80309
Date Range: 1863-2001
Size: 18 linear feet

Online Finding Aid

David Hawkins (1913-2002), scientist, mathematician, philosopher and educator was the official historian of the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, New Mexico. A Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of Colorado from 1947 to 1982, Hawkins felt passionate about educating the layman about science, especially about the destructive power of nuclear weapons. David and Frances Hawkins became leaders in improving science education for elementary schools and founded the Mountain View Center for Environmental Education at University of Colorado in 1970.

Beginning in 1943 as an administrative aide at Los Alamos, Hawkins’s first job was mostly diplomacy as two cultures, military and academic, built Los Alamos and the program to build the atomic bomb. Soon he was also attended Governing Board meetings, gaining some grasp of the evolving program. After a year or so, Hawkins was given the job of writing the wartime history of Project Y, the development of the atomic bomb. He had free access to all the top people involved, including project director J. Robert Oppenheimer and physicist Edward Teller. In effect, he was chronicling developments as they happened. David Hawkins left Los Alamos in August 1946, and his history remained classified until 1961.

In the fall of 1947 he accepted a position in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Colorado, where he remained until retiring in 1982.

According to David Hawkins, Los Alamos was an experience that changed the lives of everyone involved, radically and irreversibly, making many there, including himself, into nuclear pacifists. The atomic bomb released roughly one million times the energy of exploding dynamite. This magnitude of change in the destructive power of nuclear weapons was almost beyond comprehension. This new reality crystallized Hawkins’ passion for educating the layman about science. At the University of Colorado, David Hawkins was in charge of a physical science course for non-science students, from 1947 to 1961.

Controversy arose over Hawkins in 1951 when his previous membership in the communist party at Berkeley became front-page news. He testified before the House Committee on Un-American Affairs on December 20, 1950, stating that he had been a member of the communist party, but had left it prior to going to Los Alamos. Demands were made that the University of Colorado dismiss Professor Hawkins. The University’s Senate Committee on Privilege and Tenure investigated the Hawkins Case, and found him to be a valuable member of the faculty at the University of Colorado. The matter was dropped.

From 1962 on David Hawkins and Frances Hawkins, a leader in early childhood education, took a special interest in improving science education for elementary school children. First they established the Elementary Science Advisory Center to improve the standard of science teaching in elementary schools. The scale of their efforts increased in 1970 with the Mountain View Center for Environmental Education, funded with a grant from the Ford Foundation and university money. The Mountain View Center provided training in teaching methods for elementary and pre-school teachers, and became a nationally respected teachers’ center focusing on all the environments in which children live—physical, social, and natural and the environments of books, ideas, and history. The center’s goal was to develop strategies to provide fresh subject matter to extend the range of children’s perception and understanding and powers of analysis and expression. The Mountain View Center also published the quarterly magazine, Outlook, to share its philosophy and methods with educators.

William Gerald Burch Papers

Repository:
University of British Columbia, Library
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
1961 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 Canada
Date Range: 1924-2006
Size: 0.7 meters

Online Finding Aid

William Gerald Burch, known as Gerry, was born on August 2, 1923, the son of a forest ranger and grew up in Moyie, and Trail, British Columbia. He studied forestry at the University of British Columbia with a 3-year hiatus to serve in the navy during World War II. While completing his studies he began working for British Columbia Forest Products, the company that was to be his employer for most of his career. Burch was appointed chief forester of the company in 1968, and vice president of timberlands and forestry in 1976. He was also active in professional associations, serving for a time as president of the Canadian Institute of Forestry. Burch was awarded the Distinguished Forester Award and the Achievement Award from the Canadian Institute of Forestry. After retirement from British Columbia Forest Products in 1988, Burch remained active in forestry as a consultant for Stewart & Ewing Ltd., as an adjunct faculty member at University of British Columbia in the faculty of forestry, and by collecting research, writing papers and giving speeches. Burch was the director of “The Working Forest of British Columbia,” a book published by I.K. Barber in 1995. Burch’s autobiography, “Still Counting the Rings,” was published in 2006.The collection contains information collected in the process of publishing his biography; other projects undertaken by Burch, such as the Working Forest publication, a history of South Vancouver Island; as well as papers, research, correspondence, and speeches. The collection is divided into four series: Biographical materials; Papers, speeches and correspondence; British Columbia Forest Products; South Vancouver Island history; and The Working Forest project.

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